Book Length – Average Length of a Non Fiction Book

One of the questions that new writers always ask is "How long should my non-fiction book be?" In this article I'm going to attempt to answer that question.

However, part of the reason that new writers find it difficult to pin down an answer is because the answer is so difficult. It is not as straight forward as it looks.

First off, you need to make two decisions. Specifically, you need to decide what type of book you will be writing and how you will be publishing that book. For example, are you going to write an eBook and give it away as a bonus? Or are you going to sell it on Amazon? Are you going to write a popular how-to and use a traditional publisher? Or are you going to write a textbook and sell it through university bookstores?

The form of the book often dictates the size of the book. While the topic will have a great deal of influence, there are many other elements you need to take into account. Many of these are marketing related.

First off, you need to establish a standard length of a page. Some writers will claim there is only one standard length of a page. Unfortunately, they never agree on what the standard is! Typically, fiction uses 250 words per page, although 300 is also a common value. Non-fiction typically has longer sentences and less white space because it does not have dialogue. 300 to 500 words are sometimes used as the yardstick, although 250 is also used. Personally, I, somewhat arbitrarily, use 250. But like all the numbers when considering book length, you should consider them as yardsticks rather than firm numbers.

Now that we have the length of a page – even an arbitrary one – we can go on to estimate the size of books and articles.

Take a look in your business library. You will find that almost all your books are more than 100 pages long (about 25,000 – 50,000 words depending on your style). By fiction standards that is considered very short – novella size in fact. In fiction, a short book is between 50,000 to 80,000 words (roughly 200 – 300 pages in paperback). Although Science Fiction and some other genres have been creeping up and can now exceed 400 pages (200,000 words). A typical "popular" business book runs 25,000 to 75,000 words. Over that size is the territory of the academic or technical business book.

Typically you will find that books groups naturally after about 100 pages. The reason for this is related to the pricing of a print run. The cost to produce each book is related to the format size (eg trade paperback, paperback, letter etc.), the binding, and the number of pages. This litter tends to be priced at the 100 page mark so preferred lengths tend to come in multiples of 100. For example most short fiction runs at 200 pages (about 50,000 words (romance, westerns etc.) The next step is long fiction at 300 pages (about 75,000 words). Extra long is usually around 400 pages (100,000 words) although it can go beyond.

Ultimately, you need to check the local bookstore to determine the appropriate size. You'll find that certain markets have a preferred size (or sizes). Some publishers will also list their preferences in directories like Writers' Market, although most now prefer to make the writer guess.

Of course, what you wish the length to be, and what the actual length will be can be quite different.



Source by Glen Ford

Stop Silverfish Book Damage

We frequently hear about silverfish book damage and destruction of valuable papers in the home. Books damaged by silverfish is a common event. If there are books and important papers in your house you might want to learn ways to protect them.

There are a number of strategies you may choose to stop silverfish book damage. This article gives some information and ideas of how to avoid bug damage to paper items in your home.

The silverfish bug is a sneaky little critter and is able to hide in unseen places where they do damage and lay their eggs. Many people are not clear on what silverfish damage looks like or how to control it. Unfortunately silverfish book damage can easily be mistaken for normal wear and tear.

Items that incur silverfish bug damage include books, manuscripts, valued papers, food, clothing, plants, tapestries, and more.

Why Silverfish Book Damage Happens

The silverfish diet is why you should be concerned about silverfish your books. Books are like silverfish magnets because they contain substances that the silverfish bug loves to eat. Book bindings are a source of food because they contain glue, protein, and starch. An example of silverfish damage to books is when silverfish eat the glue that holds the spine of books together. The result is slack pages in the book as it begins to come apart. You may be surprised to find that these bugs will eat paper, book, and pretty much any item that contain starch, protein, and glue.

Often people assume that there is no risk of silverfish damage because they have not seen silverfish around their books. Even still you may notice that pages are coming loose from the book spell. This may be the result of damage by silverfish. Just because you do not see them does not mean they are not there. They are good at hiding, although you will eventually see a few if they are hanging around your books or valued papers.

Indications of the presence of silverfish bugs may be seeing silverfish shed skin or little dark droppings (feces) that look like specks on pages and papers.

Silverfish book damage also happens when silverfish eat glossy papers because it contains starch. Book bindings contain glue, paste and gum which attract them to the bindings in books.

Signs of Silverfish Book Damage

  • pages and papers with ragged edges
  • yellow stains on pages
  • abrasions on paper and photos
  • holes in paper
  • dead silverfish near books or between pages

Ways To Prevent Silverfish Book Damage

Used books and old newspapers are some ways that these bugs are brought into the home. Silverfish and silverfish eggs often arrive in them. If you must bring old books and papers into the home try to inspect them before you leave them sitting around the house. Old books unattended allow silverfish eggs to hatch. Seeing silverfish eggs with the naked eye can be a problem. You can however look for silverfish skin casings and body parts. Some people have been known to freeze books to kill unseen bugs and eggs.

  1. Silverfish can enter the home in used books, used clothing, cardboard boxes and furniture. Inspect cardboard boxes and furniture for silverfish when it is first shipped to bought into the home
  2. Used fabrics on toys pillows and other items may contain silverfish or their eggs. Wash in hot water or freezing are used in some instances.
  3. Control indoor environment – Since silverfish like a dark damp environment take steps to deny them such a habitat. Lower room humidity levels by using a dehumidifier
  4. Books should never be crowed on shelves where there is no air circulation in the room. This would result in moisture buildup and mildew growth. This is also an attractive environment for bugs. Not only do silverfish like the starch in your books they also are attracted to mold and mildew
  5. Place silverfish sticky traps close to locations where books and papers are stored. This would mean placing sticky traps on shelves close to books. One particular step is to use silverfish paks.

Learning how to deal with silverfish bugs and eliminate them from your home takes a little time and effort. Fortunately there is information available online on how to get silverfish out of your house.



Source by Boyd Niles

Stop Silverfish Book Damage

We frequently hear about silverfish book damage and destruction of valuable papers in the home. Books damaged by silverfish is a common event. If there are books and important papers in your house you might want to learn ways to protect them.

There are a number of strategies you may choose to stop silverfish book damage. This article gives some information and ideas of how to avoid bug damage to paper items in your home.

The silverfish bug is a sneaky little critter and is able to hide in unseen places where they do damage and lay their eggs. Many people are not clear on what silverfish damage looks like or how to control it. Unfortunately silverfish book damage can easily be mistaken for normal wear and tear.

Items that incur silverfish bug damage include books, manuscripts, valued papers, food, clothing, plants, tapestries, and more.

Why Silverfish Book Damage Happens

The silverfish diet is why you should be concerned about silverfish your books. Books are like silverfish magnets because they contain substances that the silverfish bug loves to eat. Book bindings are a source of food because they contain glue, protein, and starch. An example of silverfish damage to books is when silverfish eat the glue that holds the spine of books together. The result is slack pages in the book as it begins to come apart. You may be surprised to find that these bugs will eat paper, book, and pretty much any item that contain starch, protein, and glue.

Often people assume that there is no risk of silverfish damage because they have not seen silverfish around their books. Even still you may notice that pages are coming loose from the book spell. This may be the result of damage by silverfish. Just because you do not see them does not mean they are not there. They are good at hiding, although you will eventually see a few if they are hanging around your books or valued papers.

Indications of the presence of silverfish bugs may be seeing silverfish shed skin or little dark droppings (feces) that look like specks on pages and papers.

Silverfish book damage also happens when silverfish eat glossy papers because it contains starch. Book bindings contain glue, paste and gum which attract them to the bindings in books.

Signs of Silverfish Book Damage

  • pages and papers with ragged edges
  • yellow stains on pages
  • abrasions on paper and photos
  • holes in paper
  • dead silverfish near books or between pages

Ways To Prevent Silverfish Book Damage

Used books and old newspapers are some ways that these bugs are brought into the home. Silverfish and silverfish eggs often arrive in them. If you must bring old books and papers into the home try to inspect them before you leave them sitting around the house. Old books unattended allow silverfish eggs to hatch. Seeing silverfish eggs with the naked eye can be a problem. You can however look for silverfish skin casings and body parts. Some people have been known to freeze books to kill unseen bugs and eggs.

  1. Silverfish can enter the home in used books, used clothing, cardboard boxes and furniture. Inspect cardboard boxes and furniture for silverfish when it is first shipped to bought into the home
  2. Used fabrics on toys pillows and other items may contain silverfish or their eggs. Wash in hot water or freezing are used in some instances.
  3. Control indoor environment – Since silverfish like a dark damp environment take steps to deny them such a habitat. Lower room humidity levels by using a dehumidifier
  4. Books should never be crowed on shelves where there is no air circulation in the room. This would result in moisture buildup and mildew growth. This is also an attractive environment for bugs. Not only do silverfish like the starch in your books they also are attracted to mold and mildew
  5. Place silverfish sticky traps close to locations where books and papers are stored. This would mean placing sticky traps on shelves close to books. One particular step is to use silverfish paks.

Learning how to deal with silverfish bugs and eliminate them from your home takes a little time and effort. Fortunately there is information available online on how to get silverfish out of your house.



Source by Boyd Niles

What Font Should You Use For Your Book?

One of the most common questions asked by would-be self-publishers who are intent on designing and typesetting their book themselves is, "What font should I use?"

I'm always relieved when somebody asks the question. At least, it means they're not just blindly going to use the ubiquitous default fonts found in most word processing programs.

However, there is almost no way to answer the question. It's like asking, "What's the best car model for commuting to work everyday?"

You'll get a different answer from almost everyone you ask. And they may all be correct.

I am willing to offer one hard-and-fast rule, however: do not use Times New Roman or Times Roman. That will brand your book as the work of an amateur at first glance. And there are other, very practical, reasons for not using it. Times Roman and Times New Roman were designed for the narrow columns of newspapers, originally for the London Times back in the 1930s. Today, almost no newspapers still use it. How, or why, it became a word processing standard, I have no idea. The font tends to set very tight, making the text block on the page dense and dark.

Here are two caveats before proceeding to few recommendations:

  1. The typeface you choose may depend on how your book will be printed. If you look closely at most serif fonts (like Times), you will notice that there are thick and thin portions of each letter. If your book will be printed digitally, you should steer away from fonts with segments that are very thin. They tend to become too faint and affect readability.
  2. Do not get carried away with the thousands of font choices available. Most are specialized fonts suitable for titles, headlines, advertising, emotional impact, etc. And never use more than a very few fonts in a single book – we usually choose one serif font for the main text body, a sans serif for chapter titles and headings within the chapters. Depending on the book, we may select a third font for captions on photos, graphics, tables, etc. (or maybe just a different size, weight, or style of one of the other two). We may select a specialty font for use on the front cover for the title and subtitle.

For 90% of books, any of the following fonts are excellent choices:

  • Palatino Linotype
  • Book Antiqua (tends to set tight, so you may have to loosen it up a bit)
  • Georgia
  • Goudy Old Style
  • Adobe Garamond Pro (tend to have a short x-height, so it might seem too small in typical sizes)
  • Bookman (the name sort of gives it away, does not it?)
  • Century Schoolbook (tend to be a bit wide, creating extra pages)

You need to look at several paragraphs of each font to see what, if any, adjustments you may find necessary in things like character spacing and kerning. You want to avoid little confusions, like:

  • "vv" (double v) that looks like the letter "w"
  • "cl" (cl) that looks like the letter "d"

Such things can make the reading experience annoying.

If you ask other designers, you will likely get other suggestions, but I would not be surprised to see at least some of the above included in their recommendations.

You may run across some books with more unusual font choices, but there are often good reasons for it. Maybe the book is a humor book for which the designer chose a lighthearted font, for example. Such decisions should be made with care and thoughtful consideration for the effects on readability.

Never decide on your font or font size based only on viewing how it looks on your monitor. Most trade paperback books are printed in 10 or 11 point size, but some fonts require larger – or even smaller – sizes. If 12 points looks too big and 11 too small, you can try 11.5 – no need to stick with integer sizes. You might be surprised how much difference a half-point (or even a quarter-point) can make on the overall "feel" of the page.

You also have to decide on appropriate leading (pronounced like the metal), which is the distance from the baseline of one line of text to the baseline for the next line, measured in points. The result is usually expressed as a ratio of the font size in points to the selected leading in points. So, you may say you have set the body text in Georgia 11/14 or Bookman 10 / 12.5 (11-point size with 14 points leading and 10-point size with 12.5 points leading, respectively).

Word processing programs tend to work in decimal inches, forcing you to convert leading from points into inches. A standard point is equal to 0.0138 inches. Professional typesetting / layout programs (like Adobe InDesign) allow you to use points and picas to define all type measurements and settings. although you can also specify those settings in various other units (including inches).

Typically, book designers will develop more than one design for each book's interior, using different fonts, sizes, and leadings. They should typeset a few pages of the actual manuscript and print them out with the same page settings which plan to use in the final book (eg, 6 "x 9" pages). This allows the client to compare them side-by-side and evaluate them for readability and overall look.

And do not forget your target audience. Very young readers and very old readers do better with larger type. Books that are very textually dense with long paragraphs frequently need more leading and a wider font.

Ultimately, you have to choose based on what your gut reaction is to the typeset samples. It never hurts to ask other people to read it and tell you if one option is easier to read than another.

If you want to gain an appreciation for typography and how to make appropriate design decisions, I recommend the following excellent books:

The Complete Manual of Typography by James Felici

The Elements of Typographic Style by Robert Bringhurst

Book Design and Production by Pete Masterson

For those who insist on using Microsoft Word to typeset books, you really should buy and study Perfect Pages by Aaron Shepard. He is the reigning guru of how to do it.

It is far better to buy professional layout software and then learn all you can about typography and how to apply those principles to book design … or to hire a professional to do for you. The latter course will leave you more time to develop a dynamic marketing plan for your latest book and start writing your next one!



Source by Walt Shiel

Book Publishing And Marketing Defined, Along With The Marketing Mix Framework

Marketing a book has parallels to the marketing of any other product or service. With that reality in mind, I have organized a 14 P framework that can be used for conceptualizing and planning any marketing effort.

Book publishing can be defined as causing a book to be in a printed form and available to the public for purchase . Over the past decade, the first part – getting a book into printed form – has been dramatically simplified because of Print-on-Demand (POD) manufacturing. POD allows authors to avoid paying for a large print run and managing an inventory, yet to still have exactly as many printed books as needed. Pages of a POD book can be in full color or black on white; the binding can be paperback or casebound (hardback) with either a dust jacket or a laminated cover.

The second part of the definition – making books available to the public for purchase – has been a marketing responsibility shared by the publisher and the author. Making available can be thought of as having two components: making potential buyers aware of your book, and ensuring copies are readily available for those buyers to purchase.

Depending on your publishing house or service, you will have access to different tools for building the awareness and accessibility. It is best to understand the bookselling environment so you can be most effective with your marketing initiatives – at whatever scale and by whatever means you decide to promote your book.

MARKETING IS NOT THE SAME AS HIGH-PRESSURE SELLING

Some people are terrified and paralyzed by the irrational notice that marketing is synonymous with personally badgering people, somehow coercing them into buying something they do not particularly want or need. Relax! You really do not need to transform yourself into an obsessive, self-promoting ego-maniac to be successful.

Such common misconceptions can prevent an author from seeing that marketing is actually a creative exercise, an intriguing puzzle-solving process with limitless possibilities. Authors are very creative people and, therefore, well-equipped to find marvelous solutions. All they need is a practical framework for decision-making, plus some basic knowledge of the book trade and the available options.

For the marketing of your book to be sustainable, one needs to find a balance – weighing one's home life and other priorities on one hand, with your time and financial commitment to book selling on the other. Balance is easiest to sustain if you can select marketing tactics that suit your fancy, so you can enjoy promoting your book, rather than feeling drained or uncomfortable. I have confidence you can find the time and the commitment to carry out a few high-payoff promotional activities. After all, you had the personal discipline to write an entire book, right?

Before you and I go any further, let us agree on what marketing means and entails.

Surprisingly, even though one can get an advanced university degree in marketing, there is no consensus in academia nor in the business world about a definition of this word. I know this because I have taught marketing at the college level. Imagine the confusion when I moved on to manage a communications consultancy, and clients would say marketing when they mean in-person selling, or advertising, or setting up distribution networks, or promoting franchises or running contests or just about anything. This was frustrating, at times embarrassing, and always counter-productive – until I devised the definition shown below.

This definition is the conceptual framework for the marketing mix you can develop. This framework has been used with remarkable success to build tens of millions of dollars of wealth for authors and other business clients.

When you are developing a marketing strategy in any line of business, you will be thinking about how to allocate resources and align your efforts in a number of areas simultaneously, trying to juggle priorities. The classic 'marketing mix' I once taught to business students asserts there are only four aspects (the 4 Ps) to be considered: product, price, place and promotions. This definition of the marketing mix was created by Jerome McCarthy in his 1960 book called Basic Marketing: A Managerial Approach . In the real world, the 4 P framework is clearly inadequate. I suggest that you use a following more robust definition with 14 Ps when you are dropping how to sell your new book.

Marketing is the process of creating, implementing, monitoring and evolving a strategy for the complete marketing mix, which is:

  • having a needed product (or service)
  • available at a convenient place (and time)
  • for a mutually satisfactory price (value),
  • while ensuring that the correct segments of the public
  • are aware (the promotional mix)
  • and motivated ( positioning )
  • all in a manner which takes advantage of strategic partnerships
  • and contributions to the overall purpose (passion).

The promotional mix includes:

  • personal sales ,
  • publicity & public relations,
  • paid advertising ,
  • and sales promotions .

Ideally, this will be done with respect and consideration to:

  • financial profits ,
  • the planet (our environment)
  • and people (society).

While you digest that mouthful, consider that, as you solve your book's marketing mix puzzle, you will often be substituting creativity and personal connections for the brute-force, expensive strategies employed by the large publishing houses.

The precedent marketing advice is an excerpt from Book Marketing DeMystified by Bruce Batchelor [ISBN 978-1-897435-00-7].



Source by Bruce Batchelor

The Legend of Pop Hollinger, First Comic Book Dealer

It's strange that most comic book collectors and dealers have never heard of Pop Hollinger. This 47-year-old retired teacher from Concordia, Kansas was the first dealer who bought and sold old novels, pulp magazines, magazines and comic books. Hollinger ran his shop from 1939 in Concordia, during the deep economic depression, to 1971. Whether thousands of comic book dealers today have or never heard of Pop Hollinger, they follow in his footsteps: selling, buying and trading them.

Mr. Hollinger started his business selling periodicals in a basement underneath a grocery store. He sold most anything he owned, including classic paperback novels published by Pocket Books for 25 cents each. Soon, he grew his business, selling used pulps, paperbacks, magazines, and comic books. He specialized in comics which were quickly becoming popular. After a few years, he ran a vibrant business, even expanding his business which included as many as 15 to 20 outlets around Concordia. Hollinger even popularized a mail order service for interested buyers across the country. Selling through mail ordering made Pop realize that there was a demand for back issues. For this purpose, he would store issues for future business. For 20 or 30 cents a week a person could receive five or ten comics, respectively. This was an unbeatable bargain when you could buy one at the local newspaper stand for 10 cents.

1939 was a special year for comic books, which featured, for the first time, superheroes. No doubt he would have owned the most famous, such as: Action Comics # 1 (first appearance of Superman), Detective Comics # 27 (first appearance of Batman), Superman # 1, Batman # 1, Wonder Woman # 1, All- Star, All-Flash, Timely Comics (future Marvel Comics) and Fawcett Comics. These "Golden Age" comics became "super" sellers. But there were also many other others on the market.

Hollinger used radically unorthodox methods for preserving each of his books, because he knew kids could easily tear them up, and many others thread them out in the trash. Pop soon found out comics did not wear well under constant buying, selling, and trading. So, he bound the books with brown or green tape around the spine and on the inside to preserve them from being torn apart. He also knew that comics were made of pulp which attracted insects, so he treated them with special chemicals that repelled them. He even took out the original staples, replacing them with new ones. Finally, he pressed them flat using a press of his own design that introduced several hundred pounds of pressure. Today's collector or dealer would never use this method of preservation because it would ruin the book's value. Instead, dealers and collectors carefully put the books in Mylar bags and insert a cardboard backing, so they will not bend or tear. Even so, Hollinger deserves credit for creating his own method of preserving them.

By 1942, there were roughly 50 comic book publishers. Each publisher produced at least 30 different ones, which totaled to several thousand different issues circulating per month! So, Pop felt the need to publish a comic book catalog. Comics came in all sorts of genres: science fiction, detective, fantasy, spy, humor, romance and many others. He owned so many of the same issues. So, it's no wonder he thought that selling comics could be profitable. According to the eBay website, his business ads are set: "Old or used comic books are worth money. We pay from 1c to $ 1.00 each for certain old comics … Be among the first in your community to collect old comics." In this same ad, Pop claimed to "carry a large assortment of every comic book published."

Unfortunately, in 1952 Hollinger's supply took a turn for the worst. A flood had come through his area of ​​the state, flooded his stores, and destroyed thousands of most of his inventory. Sadly, most of them had to be thrown out. To make matters worse, in 1954 many comics that were published before were recalled by the US government due to unsuitable content for children. But Hollinger persevered with his business.

Between 1961 until he closed his business, ten years later, Hollinger began selling brand new superhero comic books created primarily by Marvel Comics. In November of 1961, Marvel published the first issue of the "Fantastic Four" – a group of new superheroes who became very popular. Fantastic Four # 1 started the "Marvel Age" of comics. Other "Marvel Age" superheroes were soon introduced: Spiderman, Ironman, Thor, the Hulk, Antman, and Captain America (brought back from World War 2). All comic (not just Marvel) published from 1956 to 1969, became known as the "Silver Age" of comics. Today, many of the early issues published by Marvel are worth almost as much as those printed in the late 1930s and early 1940s.

Pop Hollinger was a rare businessman who had foreseen the value of comic books. Who knew how he thought that comic books were of value to be read and collected, not read and thrown away? Nobody would have thought to start such a dealership, especially in the late 1930's during the Great Depression. As a matter of fact, it would have been "comical" to have started a comic book dealership. Pop beat the odds by starting a business almost no one would have ever considered. If you ever come across an old comic with either brown or green tape along the spine, you probably would have a classic pulp gem owned by the legendary dealer himself.



Source by Harrington A Lackey

Reading Books For Pleasure, An Enjoyable Event

You like to read. You just do not like to read what the teacher tells you you have to read for class. Such boring books. Sure, they are called classics. Dickens, Elliot, Shakespeare, Sir Walter Scott – All those and more. I guess if you were to read them on your own you may enjoy them.

School may have done you a disservice. All those book reports both written and oral. Theme, premise, overview.

Books are made to be enjoyed not suffered through.

To enjoy a book there is a proper way to read it.

Let's look at nonfiction.

Pick up the book. Feel its weight. Rotate it in your hand.

Look at the title. Ask yourself, before you open the pages, just what the title tell you the book is about.

Now open it. Look at the table of contents. This should tell you a bit of what is going to be covered. If there is an introduction, read it. If you like jot down questions you want answered. Interact with the book.

Then start reading it.

If it were fiction you should note the point of view. By this I mean is it first person or second ?. How many points of view? What is the genre? Mystery? Adventure? Romance? Did it satisfy? Would you recommend this to your friend?

A non fiction book would be read to get information, Does it do job?

Look at the appendix. Maybe it will also have an index.

Let's take an example.

The book to be read is a book by Zig Ziglar.

Ziglar was a motivational speaker who recently passed away.

You pick up his book called Top Performance with the subtitle. How to develop excellence in yourself and others.

Fine. The title tells you what you will expect t learn in the book.

How to present yourself

You notice it was written with the help of Jim Savage.

It is hard cover. There are about 288 pages.

You open to the page of contents It has three parts you notice. There are 16 chapters. An epilogue is at the end. A recommended reading list concludes the book.

There is a forward and an introduction. Each chapter opens with a quote and concludes with a summary called Performance Principles.

You start to read it. You like the style. Ziglar writes like a neighbor talking to you over the back fence. As he writes he instructs. Over and over he says you can have everything in life you want if you just help enough other people get what they want .. It makes a person feel good.

So that is one example. I am sure that you get the idea.

Go. And enjoy reading for pleasure.



Source by Dane Swanson

Authors: The Reality of Why You're Not Selling Books

Some of my best blog ideas are a direct result from something I read on Facebook. Today is no exception.

An author complained that they are not selling any books. Yet, when I looked at their activity on Facebook, it's obvious they spend a lot of time playing around and doing things that actually takes a lot of time away from marketing their book (s).

This is not a judgment on how they choose to spend their time, but facts are facts. We all have the same amount of time in a day. How we use our time determines the results we achieve. Plain and simple.

To succeed at anything, you MUST have laser focus on the result you're trying to achieve. Without it, you spin your wheels and waste precious time on activities that do not move you close to what you say you want.

Authors MUST Market

No matter how you slice it, as an author, it's your responsibility to do what you can to market your books. And marketing takes time, effort and focus.

Marketing does not have to take hours out of your day. With as little as 30 minutes a day, you can produce amazing results.

Checklist

One of the best tools for highly productive marketing is a checklist. A list designed to keep you on track with what needs to be done.

Here's a simple checklist, specific to blogging, when used each day, will produce results.

  • Create shareable content with your market (community) in mind
  • Develop a catchy title
  • Add images relevant to the content
  • Include keywords in the post to optimize searchability
  • Add a call to action (CTA)
  • Utilize social share buttons
  • Share on social media

If your preference is YouTube, you can use a similar list.

  • Create a short video that is of interest to your market (community)
  • Consider keywords and phrases people will search on
  • Create a searchable title based on what your market is interested in
  • Add a call to action in the video and description
  • Share the direct link to the video with your subscriber list and on social media
  • Post videos on a regular basis

Consistency Pays Off … Big Time

What are you doing today, and every day, to build your online presence? What are you doing to reach your market? What are you doing to get your message out?

Your outcomes will not happen by chance. They happen by design.

What are you doing to design your success?

List one action you take that helps you achieve success. Consistent action is not only on a professional level. What you do personally contributions to your professional well-being.

My Formula for Success

On a personal level, I take time each day to meditate. This comes before anything else I do. The reason being is to get my head and heart right with what the day will hold.

I also focus on my physical well-being. Whether it be gym time or running a few miles, I do something to get my energy up.

For my business success … I focus on how to serve my market AND how to get seen.

One thing I've been fine tuning is my activity on YouTube. I've cleaned up my channel to have a solid message for authors on how to market themselves.

It's easy for all of us to get sidetracked playing around on social media watching the cute videos, reading the latest tweets about whatever we get distracted by and basically diddling the day away.

To get the result of what you want in your business, regardless of what type of business you have, focus is essential.

What do you do to stay the course and gain visibility for your products, services and you?



Source by Kathleen Gage

Best Books For New Aquarium Owners

" You and Your Aquarium " is a book that is written by author Dick Mills. This interesting book covers various aspects of both saltwater and freshwater fish keeping and also elaborates on how to set up your first tank. A species guide to freshwater and saltwater fish is provided in this book and the species guide covers some of the most popular fish in the aquarium hobby. This book also elaborates on basics of filtration, heating, types of tanks and feeding.

" The Aquarium Handbook " is a book that is written by author David Goodwin. This helpful book is one of the best books for freshwater fish and has an illustrated guide on which species of fish to keep in your freshwater aquarium. The species guide has clear pictures of various species of fish and the species guide also elaborates on the feeding habits of the fish. Basics of aquatic plants information is also covered in this book. The information included about aquatic plants includes names of plants are their requirements. This book also provides information about general guidelines of fish keeping.

" Corals of The World " volume one, two and three are indeed the best books for new aquarium owners since these three books have detailed information about corals from all over the world. These books are highly recommended as they cover topics such as technical and non technical information about various corals, pictures of the corals and history about corals.

Practical Fish Keeping magazine also known as PFK is a series of magazines that are published periodically and are of immense value to new aquarium owners. This magazine covers incidents of what happens around the world in the fish keeping hobby and also provide answers on some of the most common questions asked by new aquarium keepers.

Tropical Fish Hobbyist is another magazine that is very popular with fish keepers. This magazine provides invaluable information on all aspects of fish keeping and also elaborates on which are the best products for your aquarium along with reviews and adverts.



Source by Richard Gilliland

Books Set in Australia – Five Novels to Read Before You Travel

A trip to Australia is one that offers endless variety – you could spend your time partying in Sydney, you could make an adventurous journey to the Outback, or you could wallow in the many wineries on offer in several Australian states. Australia is a big country and unless you have months to spend there, you are going to have to make some decisions on how best to spend you time. To help you do that, here are some books set in Australia – five novels depicting different aspects of Australian life and history.

'The Secret River' by Kate Grenville

A story of Australia's beginnings, William Thornbill and his wife Sal are sent from London to the fledgling colony of New South Wales in the early 1800's. After some time in Sydney (very different from the Sydney of today!) They decide to try their luck on some land Will has set his eye on along the Hawkesbury River. The challenges they face from their environment, the local Aborigines and fellow settlers reminds us of how harsh the country was for those who decided to make it their home. There are some magnificent descriptions of the landscape as seen by an outsider, and the books gives a 'warts and all' look at the impact of settlement on Australia's indigenous peoples.

'A Town Like Alice' by Neville Shute

While the first part of this novel is set in the Malayan jungle during WWII, what follows is a story that brings you to rugged, country Australia. If you want to know what life was like in a small outback town (more of a hamlet really) in the 1940's and 50's then this novel gives you a good idea. You are subject to the harshness of the landscape and the incredible distinctions involved, as Englishwoman Jean Paget travels to the heart of Australia to find a man she met whilst captured by the Japanese in Malaya. The language and attitudes, particularly in relation to Australia's Aborigines, are true to their time and should be taken as such. But it gives a good indication of the realities of life in rural Australia, something which is still a strong cultural impact on Australians today.

'Breath' by Tim Winton

From the desert to the sea now in this novel by one of Australia's most respected writers. This novel is set in Australia's south-west corner, at a time when the area was more of a home for the logging industry than for the tourists and vineyards of today. Set mainly in the 70's, this is a coming-of-age story about teenager Bruce as he seeks to overcome the boredom of country life with some high risk activities – like surfing off what can be a dangerous and deadly coastline, and developing a dark friendship with an older woman. As Bruce begins to grow up, both emotionally and sexually, we are grateful to some of the most poetic and exhilarating descriptions you will ever find of the 'religion' that is surfing. And you too, will feel as if you have explored the rugged and beautiful coastline of this part of the country.

'Bad Debts' by Peter Temple

Peter Temple is one of Australia's leading crime writers, and this novel is our introduction to his hero Jack Irish. – an inner-city Melbourne solicitor with a love of Australian Rules Football, gambling, and part time cabinet-making. This is Melbourne in winter, complete with its rain, pubs and shady underworld. Irish has been sober for a number of years after one of his dodgy clients murdered his wife, and now Danny, another former client, needs his help. But when Danny is killed, Irish discovers there are plenty of the city's political elite who would like the past to remain undisturbed, and he is determined to get to the truth. Temple's novels may not give you 'sun and sand', but you will be treated to as much genuine Australian vocabulary and city sub-culture as you can handle.

'Summerland' by Malcolm Knox

And finally to Sydney, and a novel that explores the life of the city's idle rich. Four young Sydneysiders have been friends since they were teenagers, and living around the city's northern beaches they have the world at their feet. They form two couples and spend every Christmas at Palm Beach, a popular holiday location for the affluent. But despite all this, their friendship is based on lies, as Richard finds out when he learns of the long-running affair between his wife and his best friend. If you'd like an insight into a live of the privileged few in Sydney, then this novel will take you there.

These noveles are just a taste of many books set in Australia, but they are well worth reading in the lead-up to your travels or on the plane. Immersing yourself in a novel about the place you are going to will not only give you an insight into the place itself, but it will whet your appetite for your travels ahead, making it far more enjoyable once you get there.



Source by Suzi Butcher